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The importance of acoustics in coliving or cohousing

By Acoustics, Architecture, Construction, Decoration, News No Comments

Good acoustics in coliving or cohousing improves the quality of life of the residents, but where and how do acoustics affect this new type of housing? Coliving or cohousing is a form of shared housing in which tenants have a private area consisting of a separate bedroom, usually with a bathroom and kitchen, and common spaces for shared use such as a kitchen, dining room, coworking spaces, library, gym, multimedia rooms, swimming pool, sports facilities or large living rooms. The acoustic conditioning of these rooms ensures common spaces with good acoustic comfort, promoting coexistence and well-being. One of the most attractive and functional solutions to address the improvement of acoustics in coliving or cohousing is the installation of wood acoustic panels. These panels are designed to effectively absorb and diffuse sound, thereby reducing reverberation and unwanted noise. Wood is an excellent material for this, as it is aesthetically pleasing and blends well into most interior designs. Many coliving or cohousing projects are already incorporating wood acoustic panels from the Spigoacustic, Spigotec or Spigoline families in the design of their common areas. The ecological and sustainable origin of the wood from which they are made, the warmth and elegance they bring to any interior design and the guarantee of being able to offer healthy spaces from the point of view of acoustics are key factors in making this decision. If you have any questions, please contact Spigogroup’s technical department: comercial@spigogroup.com           If you liked this post about acoustics in coliving or cohousing, you may also be interested in:   - Why is wood one of the best materials for decorating and constructing buildings? - Definition of acoustic conditioning and soundproofing, what is the difference? - Request a quotation for acoustic panels and wood panelling - Interior design of hotels: the importance of acoustics in hotel reception areas    

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Definition of acoustic conditioning and soundproofing, what is the difference?

By Acoustics, Architecture, Construction No Comments

The definition of acoustic conditioning and the definition of soundproofing explain the great difference between the two terms, which are often confused. Acoustic conditioning is the set of actions that we carry out in a room to control the annoying sound imbalances produced by reverberation that hinder proper musical hearing and the intelligibility of messages, speeches and conversations. Reverberation is the permanence of sound beyond the time required to properly hear and understand a message. Explained in a more technical manner, “reverberation time” is the time it takes for the sound to decay by 60 dB as received stood the sound emission source stops. Soundproofing, on the other hand, is an action by which we sound insulate a space from its surroundings, thereby preventing external noises (traffic, machinery, environment, etc.) from reaching the interior and also preventing the sound produced in the interior from reaching adjoining spaces or the exterior of the building. Thus, while acoustic conditioning only affects and relates to the interior of a room and the quality of sound it provides, soundproofing is more concerned with the relationship of the room to the outside and the level of noise and sound transmitted between the exterior and interior (and vice versa). To undertake acoustic conditioning, acoustic panels, like those offered by Spigogroup, which correct the effects of reverberation, are used. Soundproofing, on the other hand, requires sound insulating materials that prevent sound transmission between rooms and the outside.       If you liked this post about definition of acoustic conditioning, you may also be interested in:   - Request a quotation for acoustic panels and wood panelling - Interior design of hotels: the importance of acoustics in hotel reception areas - 24 articles on wood acoustic panels and the projects where they are used - Wood slat acoustic panels for increased acoustic comfort

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Artificial intelligence, acoustics and architecture

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AI is here to stay and the concepts of Artificial Intelligence, Acoustics and Architecture are unavoidably going to go hand in hand from now on. The integration of artificial intelligence in the field of architecture and design opens up a world of new opportunities to improve the acoustic quality and efficiency of built spaces. The way sound propagates and is perceived can affect the comfort and functionality of building and, with the help of AI, architects can better understand and control their acoustics. Using deep learning algorithms, machines can analyse and predict the behaviour of sound in a given environment. This allows designers to adjust the configuration of spaces and the layout of architectural elements to achieve higher acoustic quality. For example, AI can help to determine the degree of absorption and optimal placement of acoustic panels used for reverberation control in acoustic conditioning work. In addition, AI can be used to simulate and evaluate the acoustic performance of spaces prior to their construction. This reduces the need for costly physical prototypes and allows designers to test different configurations virtually. By accurately predicting how sound will behave in a given environment, more informed decisions can be made to improve acoustics from the earliest stages of design. The application of AI in architectural acoustics not only helps designers. End users of spaces can also benefit. From offices and educational facilities to auditoriums and homes, the integration of AI into acoustic design contributes to the creation of more pleasant and functional environments.           If you liked this post about Artificial Intelligence, acoustics and architecture, you may also be interested in:   - Acoustic panels for exhibition halls, museums and galleries - How wood panels help to achieve VERDE certification - Flexible wood slat cladding: so acoustics does not limit creativity - Customised acoustic panels made to measure according to the requirements of each project  

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Acoustic panels for exhibition halls, museums and galleries

By Acoustics, Architecture, Construction, Decoration, News No Comments

Is the use of acoustic panels for exhibition halls, museums and galleries of any use? The answer is ‘yes’, and we explain why below Exhibition halls are, together with temples, the places where you can usually enjoy the most silence and tranquillity. It might seem that it is not necessary to undertake their acoustic conditioning but, in reality, it is, and this is partly due to the new uses we are now making of these places. Perhaps out of concentration, perhaps out of respect, but in museums art is enjoyed in silence. However, when the art on display has a certain fame, we find groups of visitors led by guides who, often at the same time and in the same place, struggle to get their explanation across to their audience, even with the help of small loudspeakers or translators. This situation, worsened by the sound reflection of walls, doors, display cabinets or protective glass or acrylic sheet panels, makes it necessary to use acoustic panels to correct the imbalances produced by reverberation that prevent us from enjoying the acoustic comfort that we would like. On the other hand, art galleries, museums and exhibition halls have long been used for social events that bring together many people in the same room. The sound environment of cross-talk, together with the noise from the catering service and even ambient music from loudspeakers, creates a sound setting that requires the control provided by the use of sound-absorbent wood panels. If you have any questions, please contact Spigogroup’s technical department: comercial@spigogroup.com         If you liked this post about acoustic panels for exhibition halls, you may also be interested in:   - Flexible wood slat cladding: so acoustics does not limit creativity - 3 examples of interior wood cladding for health centres or hospitals - Customised acoustic panels made to measure according to the requirements of each project - Acoustic panels for press rooms: press room at the Ministry of Justice in Madrid    

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